Engineer Says Barbuda Hardly Felt Category 5 Winds

A Barbadian Engineering consultant has cast doubt on the strength of the winds produced by Hurricane Irma that decimated our sister Isle of Barbuda on September 6, 2017.

The National Hurricane Center in Miami, Florida labeled Hurricane Irma as a Category 5+++ Hurricane packing very dangerous winds when Irma struck Barbuda, and later, Anguilla, the British Virgin Islands, St Martin and the United States Virgin Islands.

Tony Gibbs, the Director of Consulting Engineers Partnership Barbados; says it was widely accepted, particularly considering the extent of the damage suffered by all those countries, however Gibbs said it was accepted in the international scientific community that the National Hurricane Center often overestimates the strength of hurricanes and says Barbuda hardly ever felt category five winds.

“When hurricane Irma struck Barbuda it was described as a Category 5 hurricane, and recently we have been doing a more detailed analysis of wind speeds of the hurricanes of 2017. Scientifically the information is quite different from what we have been getting from the National Hurricane Center,” Gibbs said.

The engineering consultant explained “You can say that Barbuda did experience a category 5 hurricane. However, when you look at the actual data for Puerto Rico, even though it was reported that the island was hit by a category 5 hurricane, only a small portion of the island actually experienced close to category 3 to 4 winds. The majority of the territory was hit by category 2, category 1 and tropical storm winds,” Despite the strength of the storm, Gibbs acknowledged that it did considerable damage to infrastructure, something he said the region must take into consideration.

Gibbs also said that Caribbean countries should build to withstand category five winds since the data analysis shows that the region was in for even more severe weather systems in the next decade as a result of climate change.

“The combination of greenhouse warming and natural variability will produce unprecedented cyclones and weather activity in the coming decade in the Caribbean, so we are in for some exciting times. Category 2 buildings like your homes, hotels and general office buildings must adjust for a 13 per cent increase in wind speeds to cater for climate change in the Eastern Caribbean. The category 3 and 4 buildings, which are the more important buildings in the community, such as hospitals, already cater for very strong gusts, but still we must adjust the codes by a further ten per cent,” Gibbs said.

Source: Barbados Today

  • Leslie St. John

    This headline is inaccurate.
    Even the article disagrees with it….

    “You can say that Barbuda did experience a category 5 hurricane. However, when you look at the actual data for Puerto Rico, even though it was reported that the island was hit by a category 5 hurricane, only a small portion of the island actually experienced close to category 3 to 4 winds. The majority of the territory was hit by category 2, category 1 and tropical storm winds,”